An honest conversation about period

The words menstruation and period are usually seen as bad words. Luckily for us, they are the best words to say out loud!😊

There are two important things that we, as a community, should speak about more often:
- First: Menstruation is a natural process. You’re not different, weird, or dirty because of that.
- Second: You’re not alone. More than 800 million people menstruate daily.

Why society doesn't consider period talk a normal conversation? Why do 800 million people menstruate, and we still don't know all the information that should be known? Let’s make this an everyday conversation and get rid of the stigma that surrounds the topic.

Why is it important to talk about it?
By bringing the topic of menstruation out in the open, we're letting others know that it's okay to discuss it.

Why is it important to be comfortable talking about menstruation? It’s essential to understand why we bleed every month, why we experience so many mood swings and body changes, and many other unknown questions.

Menstruation is a health matter: the more we know, the more we are able to advocate for ourselves and notice whether there's something wrong or not.

Embracing your period blood is an act of love!

Fun fact: menstrual blood is not just blood!
At every cycle, our body prepares our uterus for pregnancy. In case there’s no fertilization, the uterus returns to its normal state. That means discarding the extra blood, tissue, stem cells, etc. All of that constitutes our menstrual blood. It's a naturally programmed process developed by our bodies. Isn't it amazing?

How to start talking about the menstrual period?
Let's get rid of all the stigma from discussions involving menstruation! But how to start?

A smooth way to begin is by talking with people you already feel comfortable with. You can share something funny or embarrassing that happens during your period and ask if they experience something similar.

Try not to use euphemisms when talking about your menstruation. Instead of saying “I'm in that time of the month”, you can simply say “I’m on my period”. Using the actual words is empowering and makes the conversation a normal period talk.

Talking about PMS, cramps, or any other symptom can be a good way to start a conversation. You will be surprised to see that you are not alone.

If you tried something that helps relieve cramps or any other symptoms, share it with your friends. You can exchange ideas, and the conversation can be endless.
Periods are a natural part of our lives. The more we discuss it with others and share our experiences, the less confusion and misconception around it there will be.

Need more inspiration?
Check out these women that make the conversation about menstruation less awkward

~ Fu Yuanhui, a Chinese swimmer at the Rio Olympics, talked about getting her period. When she finished fourth in the women's medley relay, an interviewer asked if she was in pain, and Fu said: "Actually, my period started last night so I'm feeling pretty weak and really tired.” ♥

~ Kiran Gandhi competed at the London Marathon in her period without using sanitary pads. "I got my flow the night before the marathon and it was extremely painful", she said. Instead of running 42km with a wad of cotton material wedged between her legs, she chose to bleed freely and just run. ♥

~ Rupi Kaur was censored by Instagram after posting a photo of her bleeding through her pants and onto her bed. She had her photo taken down twice, as it didn’t “follow the Community Guidelines”. She had her photo reactivated and also had a lot to say about what happened: "I bleed each month to help make humankind a possibility." ♥

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